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to be the guy who is very conservative, catholic, he's got a great education track record but i think is going to be well-positioned to be, if we're going to modernize someone we feel safer, he could be the guy. >> one last word on the millennials since we did have that question. according to the data i missing, it doesn't look like obama shares the millennial vote, its operational shores -- is creeping up. he did win it 66-32 in 2008. he's not there yet, 34-point margin. the pupil had about a 30-point margin. that's getting close. 56% of what all is said and done he may be wind up with a bird outside margin among millennials, but just not as big as he had in 2008, and, of course, another related question is whether and to what extent these votes will turn out. in 2012. so keep in mind in 2008 it wasn't that astronomical. >> the racial mix. >> absolutely right. >> the white millennials are noticeably more liberal. >> he was at 55% among whites under 30. in our poll we have him down to 50. >> that's pretty good. but anyway, short answer is looking pretty good for obama, maybe not quite as good
are perhaps the most important innovation in public education over the last generation in the united states. but there are many myths and misconceptions about charters and about the motivation and the goal of many in the movement. use of some of that play out in the recent chicago future strike. beyond that there are many people in the united states to the best charters are either an unmitigated good or alternatively, an existential threat. .. >> if we are going to get back to the living standards of america, we are only going to do that by lifting up and truly changing public education in this country. that is the only way that is ever going to be achieved. so with that, let me introduce roland fryer. he is going to summarize his paper. he is going to do 34 slides in one hour. >> thank you very much. it is great to be here again and to see so many familiar faces. >> let's start with this first. good morning. we all know that education in america, visited the show that our performance has grown over the last 30 to 40 years. if you look at the latest statistics as to how many schools didn't
there through >> thick and thin, lost their house in a fire when they needed help with their education we were there and that is what families and friends do. i've been living in the real world, and as i have gone through what 114 counties, they are starving for honesty, someone they can believe in and real little practical knowledge. we have to be realistic about where we are. 40-hour out of the 50 economic growth in the last ten years. we are 50th in the states in job creation since 2008. and 1 million missourians on food stamps out of 6 million. is this truly the best we can do is this a legacy that we will leave for our grand kids and kids'. two relatives one side the declaration of independence and one sign of the constitution john rutledge both from south carolina. my middle name as rutledge. it is a dishonor to our ancestors to find out where we are in missouri right now. we deserve better leadership, and i plan to give it. >> thank you. jim higgins. >> the libertarian party has returned 40-years-old now last year. and i have been a libertarian for almost that amount of time. i first di
for education but we can keep it in this country but you still have to go through the process. there's a way of solving this. they key is for republicans and democrats to work together. berkley: there is a way to solve all of these challenges. and my opponent does a good game, the fact of the matter is that he doesn't track is right. is opposed to comprehension immigration reform. he's in favor of the arizona law that most was declared unconstitutional by the united states senate -- by the united states supreme court. my opponent thought the arizona law was so good he wanted to bring a tear to nevada, but the one thing, the one thing that i can't believe he is opposed is the d.r.e.a.m. act. and he voted against it. not 80%, not 20%. he voted against 100% of the. what does the d.r.e.a.m. act said? it says if you're a youngster that has come to the united states through no fault of your own and you're in college or you volunteer for our military, you should have a pass to legal status. it couldn't be any more simple than that, and my opponent voted against it and the also come he's on record s
for educators and districts to make better decisions and help get evidence in a way, and in some ways that type of tool would make what they're trying to do a lot easier. >> thank you. >> i think you are the designated responder here. >> first of, it's great to get to the panel. it's fab it's aic. it there are so many good points to bring in the paper. i'm not going to spend time addressing all of them. afterwards i would like follow up with each you. it's going to make it better and stronger for for one note in the add yins you'll be on a panel like this what was life like before the app store. it they'll be shocked when you ask the question, not because you old but because they can't imagine what life was like before the app store. what you are seeing is incredible. where the imeerps and companies come from? what it is about transparency about you're getting. that's yew it's out there. you can count the things on your tablet and smartphone. we want to take the entrepreneurial innovation and use it to give teachers better tools in the classroom. that's what. the consumer report for educational
'll be waiting by the door if anyone wants information and websites to go to educate yourselves better about this. one more comment which is that natural family planning can be used 99% effectiveness, significantly greater than a lot of the contraceptives that -- >> thank you. >> have you looked at the population in south america recently? [laughter] no, let me answer this. i think that -- >> [inaudible] >> i believe what you said is valid. i really -- when i teach constitutional law and i deal with the issue offed sodomy and the laws against it in the united states, i ask the students why was it banned? okay? it's not just -- sodomy applies to both homo sexual intercourse, and i asked why was it banned in the united states? it was a dearly held belief, in which i share, which is when people get together to express love through sexuality, it should be an expression of love and not just the need to have a physical release because when -- we're using another human being for our own pleasure. i find that immoral, all right? however, it is absolutely true that what you're talking about does -- is not
in education. that investment is not limited to more money. it also means getting parents involved. it also means expecting more from everybody along whole education ecosystem, from administrators to policy-makers to teachers come expecting more out of everyone. so what i have on the table in san antonio is basically a 1/8 cent sales tax that will cost the median household in the city $7.81 per year. mind you, every day in texas, it cost $359.81 to keep a juvenile incarceration. what we have on the table is the opportunity to educate more than 22,404-year-olds with -- 22,400 4-year-olds with high quality pre-k. >> i don't believe that taxes are inherently evil. >> that will be tweeted, by the way. [laughter] give them a second. [laughter] >> i do believe that taxes are inherently evil. i'd like them and nobody likes the impaired but it will the voters in san antonio that there is no way to sugarcoat this. i am asking you for this tax increase. more than that, i believe in you. i believe that may put it in front of you, you can make a decision as to whether or not you want to make this inves
medicare, cuts to education and tax cuts to the rich, he's been very forceful about contrasting his views on things with what he says are the views to the other side which are sort of embracing a host of unpopular positions to these constituencies he's mobilizing the debates and had success with it and police tried to paint romney as an out of touch equity guide working-class person of the team that it's been fairly successful strategy particularly but only with the base but white working-class voters to be competitive in this election the obama team realized correctly there is a very off-putting thing about romney which is embodied in the republican party these days, but romney doesn't particularly without saying a word of the republican performance. it has been designed to optimize the things they might say that what really ticked off the base for the democratic party and raise concerns among independent voters. they probably couldn't have done much better captured by the elements that are far away by the level of conservatism and social issues, paul business of corrupting paul ryan and
. borrowing, not to invest in hospitals and education and hospitals, but want to keep people idle. so the next time you heard a conservative say to you, labour would increase borrowing, just remember, it is this a government that is increasing borrowing this year. [applause] so what have we seen? we have seen recession, higher unemployment, higher borrowing. i don't think that's what people were promised. now look, there will be some people who say, and this as an important argument, a single people say there is a short term pain, but it is worth it for the long-term gain. but i'm afraid the opposite is true. you see, the longer you have low growth in our country, the bigger the death toll becomes for the future, and the bigger our problem will be in the future. the longer a young person is out of work, that's not just that for the prospects now. it's bad for the prospect the whole of the rest of their life. into a small business goes under during the recession, it can't just get up and running again during a recovery. so when david cameron says to you, well, let's just carry on as we are and
pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the factory of the universal secondary education and it was universal post secondary education to the extent that we could do that. we have the world's best infrastructure, bandwidth etc. then we had the world's most open and the sentry half century to increase the most energetic and talented around the world to start 40% of the new countries in silicon valley and the best rules for the capitol formation to prevent the recklessness and incentivize risk-taking. and last we had the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of c
dependent the country is on a trained and educated team oriented likable fund for the capitol population, young adult population. we haven't quite recognized the deficit we have their. as for the state level i think a lot has happened. we work of the state level and attempt to put together work of kids through consumption properly taken care of and educated and carried from conception to kindergarten. we are finding more and more business people who get the reality. the hour understanding with the situation as they are increasingly ready to take action in this area that supported salles solomon to resolve problems we find the report last march from pre-que to the cost and difficulty through kindergarten provided to 100 kids yields the reduction in special-education alone. so what is -- there is that the state level this understanding to take place and people can act on it and it can be done on a school district level. so in many respects, the power of technology and communications for this enabling people and local levels to act in ways they cannot at federally and as the act in the regi
, that they are trying to figure out how they are going to afford food, how they save for their kids' college education, they need a break. look, nobody likes taxes. i prefer that none of us had to pay taxes, including myself, but ultimately, we have to pay for the core investments that make the economy strong -- >> nobody likes taxes, let's not raise anybody taxes, okay. >> i don't mind paying more. >> businesses in america today are paying second highest tax rates of anywhere in the world. our tax rates for business in america is 35%. ireland, it's 11%. where are companies to go where they can create jobs and where they can do best in business? we need to cut the business tax rate in america. we need to encourage creating jobs, not spread the wealth around. >>> watch and engage with c-span as the presidential candidates meet in the first presidential debate tomorrow at the university of denver. the live debate gets underway at 7 eastern, and jim leher moderates, and after the debate, your reactions and comments taking your calls, e-mails and tweets on c-span, c-span radio, and online at c-span.org. >
improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l gates and also a distinguished fellow at the council on competitiveness. bard is a former u.s. representative from the state of tennessee. he served in congress for 26 years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secr
that might increase knowledge such as closely following the campaign, education, ideology, gender and the like. it doesn't establish a causal inference but increases the likelihood we have the direction of causality correct. to get a tight causal inference we do need to go to a controlled experiment. we will report one of those in the second panel and its conclusion will be the same. fact checking by in the fact checking sites, sites that develop their fact checking at length, and also the fact check model which is visually claims that we been doing at the annenberg public policy center according to the study which is in panel to produce the same finding. and as result we think that that traditional argument for the causal direction being fact-checking sides in news every on the web as well as standalone sites can increase public knowledge. with that as the background, it's my pleasure to introduce brooks jackson, a factcheck.org who will introduce the first panel. the first panel will forecast what it sees as a possible and we hope not actual deceptions of the presidential debate
through this education campaign, he developed a why you should be concerned and why you should take the necessary steps to protect yourself. don't expect someone else to protect you. the focus there and a cyber domain is protecting yourself. >> let me add to that, because i think most people in america, probably not industry but i think the average american would be shocked to know that dhs is responsible for protecting.gov governments they could have the authority and responsibly to protect dot gov. .mil. what government agency has responsibility to protect dot com. matters not a government -- if a foreign government dropped a bomb on some company headquarters here, the nazis would probably scramble planes and the present would be on the phone with some had a state somewhere. but when the same company gets hacked and loses two terabytes of data, $1 billion worth of r&d to continue taking the, nobody does that. that doesn't happen. that's got to change. that is what has to change. you all right. nobody knows about it. there's a lot more that can be done. when you talk by information
to link information flow, education and issues, expanding voter turnout is still a problem it will have only 57% of the eligible voters voting is going to control the american body of politics. and i see that as a healthy thing. so i have posed a problem without an answer, but at least i will say i think i am optimistic that this new technology is going to bring more information in those three groups that i think are the ones that will determine where this country goes. >> governor schwarzenegger commend this is your institute, so you have the last word. >> i think one of the things we should also talk about is the importance of recognizing the power of subnational government, regional government, local government because so many times i think that cities and states, provinces around the world are waiting always for some action on a national level. for instance, about mental issues. the fact of the matter is the local government can actually do about we had a disagreement with washington in the bush administration, but we moved forward. we didn't wait for anybody. they made commitments
and higher education. our achievements have not come about easily though. the aspirations of the afghan people security and peace are yet to be realized. as the world's fight continues unabated, the afghan people continue to pay the biggest price and the states in both life and treasure. tourism is not searching and the afghans a levy of town. it never was. exists beyond afghanistan's borders. therefore, while the international community the securities being safeguarded for the threat of terrorism, the people of afghanistan must know them to be made to pay the price and and/or the price of the war. it is a sacrifice of the afghan people and it is indifferent to the sacrifice of the afghan people and the precious lives lost from the international community that the campaign against terrorism be taken to the sources of terrorism and must be resolved. today in afghanistan we pursue the cause of peace and end to violence as a matter of great urgency. this means the afghan people are convinced that of the terry everett alone is not and a liquid strategy to bring security with initiatives for
union and the national education association, a first-year teachers unions. the three of the top five spending were labor unions and were very disclosed every month. a lot of what labor does is not disclosed at the same way. they have not been visible. idea back between 20,792,011, impacting the political process of the state and local level. it's a lot of money in politics, but a lot of people are talking about were the most money is coming from. this alternative back. >> so american crossroads is very quivery active in the presidential election. if you go in today with $12 million -- >> this is a president obama said the jobless or would be if we pass the stimulus is 5.6%. but this is where the jobless rate actually is. 8.1%. the difference? about 3.7 million jobs. obama spending was $5 trillion deeper in debt and now we have fewer jobs than when he started. but obama promised versus what he delivered. >> american crossers is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> oppose the president. we were talking about how to legislation spent $800 billion on a strain to fix the ec
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18

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